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Department News

Joachim Gräfe erhält Otto-Hahn-Medaille der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft

  • 04 June 2018

Der Nanomagnetismus-Forscher wird für seine innovative Forschung der Magnetisierungsdynamik auf der Nanoskala, insbesondere der Magnonik, durch den Einsatz modernster Röntgenmikroskopie ausgezeichnet.

Joachim Gräfe Linda Behringer


Nanomagnetism in X-ray Light

  • 23 March 2017

Today’s most advanced scanning X-ray microscope is operated by the Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems at Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin The MAXYMUS scanning X-ray microscope has its home at Berlin’s synchrotron radiation source BESSY II at Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin. Scientific support is provided by Dr. Markus Weigand from the “Modern Magnetic Systems” department at the Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems (MPI-IS) under the management of Professor Dr. Gisela Schütz..

Gisela Schütz


Ernst Eckhard Koch Prize for Joachim Graefe

  • 20 December 2016

On December 8, The Association of Friends of Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin granted the Ernst Eckhard Koch Prize for an outstanding PhD thesis in the research area of synchrotron radiation as well as the innovation prize “Synchrotron Radiation”. The award ceremony took place at the 8th BER II and BESSY II Users’ Meeting.

Joachim Gräfe


Ernst Eckhard Koch Prize for Joachim Graefe

  • 20 December 2016

On December 8, The Association of Friends of Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin granted the Ernst Eckhard Koch Prize for an outstanding PhD thesis in the research area of synchrotron radiation as well as the innovation prize “Synchrotron Radiation”. The award ceremony took place at the 8th BER II and BESSY II Users’ Meeting.

Joachim Gräfe


Deuterium from a quantum sieve

  • 05 December 2012

A metal-organic framework separates hydrogen isotopes more efficiently than previous methods.

In future it may be easier for chemists, biologists and physicists to obtain the ideal substance with which to clarify numerous research issues. For the first time, a team of scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems in Stuttgart, Jacobs University Bremen and the University of Augsburg have been able to apply a new method to separate hydrogen and its heavier isotope deuterium more efficiently than before. To this effect, they use a metal-organic framework as a quantum sieve to separate the isotopes. Deuterium serves to determine the structure of unknown substances, for example. Chemists also use it to investigate how reactions involving hydrogen proceed and thus create the basis on which to optimise the conversion. Biologists use deuterium to analyse metabolic processes, among other things.

Michael Hirscher


A quick switch for magnetic needles

  • 12 April 2011

Magnetic vortex cores, which can be used as particularly stable storage points for data bits, can now be switched much faster.

Microscopically tiny ferromagnetic platelets exhibit a phenomenon which could be exploited in the future for particularly stable magnetic data storage: so-called magnetic vortex cores. These are needle-shaped magnetic structures measuring 20 nanometres (millionths of a millimetre) in diameter. Five years ago, researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems (formerly the Max Planck Institute for Metals Research) in Stuttgart found a way to reverse the magnetic field needles despite their stability using only a tiny amount of energy so that their tips pointed in the opposite direction. Such a switching process is necessary to enable the vortex cores to be used in data processing. The Stuttgart scientists have now discovered a new mechanism which makes this switching process at least 20 times faster and confines it to a far smaller region than before. Magnetic vortex cores could thus provide a means of data storage which is stable, fast and greatly miniaturized.

Hermann Stoll